トップページ > Various Knowledge > NYタイムズ記事     English

ニューヨークタイムズの記事

In Deference to Crisis, a New Obsession Sweeps Japan: Self-Restraint
危機に見まわれ、新たな強迫観念が日本に広まる:自粛

[次は、記事冒頭の写真のキャプション]
An appliance store in Tokyo operated under dimmed lights to save electricity, part of a national push toward conservation after the tsunami and nuclear crisis.
節電(津波と核の危機の後の節約に向けた国民的キャンペーンの一端)のために薄暗くされた照明のもとで営業されている東京の家電販売店

Published: March 27, 2011 (2011年3月27日発表)

TOKYO — Even in a country whose people are known for walking in lockstep, a national consensus on the proper code of behavior has emerged with startling speed. Consider post-tsunami Japan as the age of voluntary self-restraint, or jishuku, the antipode of the Japan of the “bubble” era that celebrated excess.
東京発 - その国の国民はやり方をなかなか変えないことで知られているのに、適切な行動規範[自粛すること]についての国民的合意は驚くべき速度で広がった。津波後の日本は、自発的な自粛(jishuku)という、過剰を持てはやした「バブル」時代の正反対の時代になったと考えてほしい。

With hundreds of thousands of people displaced up north from the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis, anything with the barest hint of luxury invites condemnation. There were only general calls for conservation, but within days of the March 11 quake, Japanese of all stripes began turning off lights, elevators, heaters and even toilet seat warmers.
地震、津波及び核の危機から何十万もの人々が北に逃れたことで、贅沢をそのまま暗示するようなものは何でも非難を招いている。節電についての一般的な要請があっただけなのに、3月11日の地震の日には、あらゆる階層の日本人が、照明、エレベーター、ヒーターや便座ウォーマーでさえ消し始めた。

But self-restraint goes beyond the need to compensate for shortages of electricity brought on by the closing of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. At a time of collective mourning, jishuku also demands that self-restraint be practiced elsewhere. Candidates in next month’s local elections are hewing to the ethos by literally campaigning quietly for votes, instead of circling neighborhoods in their usual campaign trucks with blaring loudspeakers.
しかし、自粛は福島第一原子力発電所の閉鎖によってもたらされた電気の不足を補うことの必要性を越えている。集団で哀悼する時には、自粛はまた、どこか他の場所でも実行されることを要求する。来月の地方選挙の候補は、拡声器でがなり立てながら普通のキャンペーントラックで近所を旋回する代わりに、文字通り選挙運動を静かに行うことにより、[自粛の]精神を守り通している。

With aggressive sales tactics suddenly rendered unseemly, the giant Bic Camera electric appliance outlet in central Tokyo has dropped the decibels on its incessant in-store jingle, usually audible half a block away. At the high school baseball tournament in Osaka, bands put away their instruments; instead, cheering sections have been clapping by hitting plastic horns together.
突然の、場所柄もわきまえない攻撃的な販売戦略を有する、都心の巨大なビックカメラという電化製品のアウトレットは、いつもは半ブロック[街区]離れても聞こえる、絶え間ない店内の鳴り物のデシベルを下げた。大阪での高校野球のトーナメントでは、バンドは彼らの楽器を片付け、代わりに、応援団がプラスチックのメガホンを叩き合わせている。

There are also doubts about whether it is proper to partake in the seasonal pleasures that regulate much of Japanese life.
日本の生活の大部分を支配する、季節の楽しみに加わるのが適切かどうかという疑問もある。

“At this time of the year, we’d usually be talking about going to see cherry blossoms,” Hiroshi Sekiguchi, one of the country’s best-known television personalities, said on his Sunday morning talk show.
「この季節には、我々は桜の花を見に行くことを、普通は話している。」と関口宏(その国の最も知られたテレビのパーソナリティーの一人)はサンデー・モーニング・トークショーで言った。

In fact, cherry blossom viewing parties and fireworks festivals have been canceled. Graduations and commencements have been put off. Stores and restaurants have reduced their hours or closed. Cosmetics and karaoke are out; bottled water and Geiger counters are in.
事実、花見と花火祭は取り止められた。卒業式と始業式は延期された。店舗や飲食店は数時間短縮するか閉店している。化粧品とカラオケは、はやっていない。ペットボトルの水とガイガーカウンター[放射能測定器]が今、はやりである。

It is as if much of a nation’s people have simultaneously hunkered down, all with barely a rule being passed or a penalty being assessed.
何ら規則が下された状況でも、罰則が科せられた状況でもないのに、大部分の国民が一斉にうずくまったかのようだ。

“We are not forced or anything,” said Koichi Nakamura, 45, who runs a karaoke shop in Kabukicho, Tokyo’s famed entertainment district, where customers looking to sing their lungs out have all but vanished. “I hope it will somehow contribute to the affected areas.”
「私たちは無理強いされているのでも何でもない。」と、歌舞伎町(東京の有名な歓楽街)で、カラオケ店を経営している中村コウイチ(45才)は言った(その店では、肺が飛び出るほど歌うことを期待している顧客がほとんど消え失せた)。「私は何とかして被災地域に貢献したい。」

The almost overnight transformation is likely to continue for months, if not years. The hot summer ahead is expected to further strain the nation’s electrical network, leading to more disruptive blackouts that make it hard for business to be conducted the Japanese way, face to face and often into the night. The vast entertainment industry that greases corporate Japan, including sushi bars and cabarets, is likely to be deeply hurt.
ほとんど夜通しの様変わりは、何か月も、あるいは何年も続きそうだ。この先の暑い夏は国の電力網に、ビジネスが日本のやり方で(対面で、あるいは、しばしば夜まで)行われることを困難にするような、より破壊的な停電に至る、さらなる無理をかけるだろう。すしバーやキャバレーを含めて、日本法人の潤滑剤となっている広大な娯楽産業は、深く損害を受けそうだ。

As effective as the self-restraint has been — conservation measures have allowed Tokyo Electric Power to cancel some planned blackouts — the continued scaling back is likely to have a corrosive effect on Japan’s sagging economy. While the government will spend heavily to rebuild the shattered prefectures to the northeast, consumer spending, which makes up about 60 percent of the economy, will probably sink; bankruptcies are expected to soar.
自粛と同じぐらい効果的なもの - 節電対策は、東京電力にいくつかの計画停電を中止させることができた - [その節電対策という]継続的縮小は、日本の停滞した経済に痛烈な効果を持っていそうだ。政府が破壊された県を再建するために、東北に対して大量に金を使っている間に、個人消費(それは経済の約60パーセントを構成する)は、多分落ち込む。倒産が激増するであろう。

Had the disasters hit a more distant corner of the country, things might have been different. But because Tokyo has been directly affected by the blackouts and the nuclear crisis, the impact has been greater. The capital and surrounding prefectures, where so many companies, government agencies and news media outlets are located, account for about one-third of the country’s gross domestic product.
災害が国のもっと隅のほうを襲っていたなら、事は違っていたであろう。しかし、東京が停電と核の危機により直接影響を受けたため、衝撃は、より大きくなっている。首都と周辺の県(そこには非常に多くの会社、政府機関、およびニュースメディアアウトレット[新聞、テレビ、ラジオ、雑誌等のこと]が位置している)は、国の国民総生産の約1/3を占める。

Japan has gone through spasms of self-control before, including after the death of Emperor Hirohito in 1989. This time, though, self-restraint may be a way of coping with the traumatizing scale of the loss of life as well as the spreading fears of radioactive fallout, according to Kensuke Suzuki, an associate professor of sociology at Kwansei Gakuin University in western Japan.
日本は以前に、1989年の裕仁天皇[昭和天皇]の死後も、自制の発作を経験したことがある。しかし、今回は、鈴木謙介(西日本の関西学院大学の社会学の準教授)によると、自粛は放射性降下物が拡散している恐怖だけでなく、犠牲者がどれだけ傷付いているのかを真似る一つの方法なのかも知れない。

[次は、レポートを寄稿した人の氏名]
Reporting was contributed by Ayasa Aizawa, David Jolly, Harumi Osawa, Fuhito Shimoyama and Hiroko Tabuchi.

(Page 2 of 2)
“With the extensive coverage of the disaster zone, jishuku has become a way for people in Tokyo to express solidarity at a time of crisis,” Professor Suzuki said in an e-mail. “Jishuku is the easiest way to feel like you’re doing something, though perhaps there isn’t much thought put into how much these actions make a difference over all.”
「災害地域が広く報道されたことで、自粛は東京の人々が危機の時に団結を表現する方法になった」と鈴木教授はeメールで述べた。「自粛は、あなたが何かをやっていると感じる最も簡単な方法であるが、多分、これらの行動が全体としてどれぐらい違ってくるのかということまでは考えていない。」

It is not surprising then that the national obsession with self-restraint has bled into political circles. In several prefectures, like Gifu, Aomori and Akita, candidates have agreed not to campaign too aggressively, by limiting their appearances and not calling voters at home.
そういうことなので、自粛への国民の強迫観念が政界に、にじみ出したのは意外なことではない。いくつかの県では、岐阜、青森そして秋田のように、候補者は姿を見せることを制限することと、自宅で有権者に電話しないことによって、あまり積極的に運動しないことに同意した。

In Tokyo’s luxury shopping district, Ginza, on Sunday, Hideo Higashikokubaru, 53, a politician and former comedian, practiced jishuku-style campaigning by riding a bicycle and eschewing a bullhorn. “I’m trying my best in my own voice,” Mr. Higashikokubaru said, surrounded by voters on an intersection overlooked by Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Cartier and Bulgari.
東京の豪華な商店街(銀座)では、日曜日に、東国原英夫(53才、政治家、元コメディアン)が、自転車に乗って、拡声器を慎んで、自粛スタイルの運動を実践した。「私は私自身の声で最善を尽くしています。」と東国原氏は、シャネル、ルイヴィトン、カルチェそしてブルガリに見渡された交差点で、有権者に囲まれて言った。

Political analysts have said that such campaign constraints will favor incumbents like Shintaro Ishihara, the three-term Tokyo governor Mr. Higashikokubaru is trying to unseat.
政治評論家は、そのように運動を制約することは、石原慎太郎(東国原氏が議席を奪おうとしている3期東京都知事)のような現職者を支持するだろうと言った。

“That’s right,” Mr. Higashikokubaru said in a short interview. “That’s why I have to try even harder.”
「そのとおりです。」と東国原氏は、短い会見で言った。「そのことが、私がなお一生懸命取り組まなければならない理由です。」

But outliers, like Japan’s Communist Party, have explicitly rejected a calmer tenor to their campaigning, saying that it would rob voters of valuable information about candidates.
しかし日本共産党のようなアウトライヤー[主流から大きく外れている人]は、それは有権者から候補者に関する貴重な情報を奪うと言って、自分たちの運動に対して、より静かにするという方針をはっきりと拒絶した。

Another objector was Yoshiro Nakamatsu, 82, who despite a past draw of only a few thousand votes was running for Tokyo governor for a fifth time. Mr. Nakamatsu — an inventor who claims credit for hundreds of gadgets — campaigned in front of his truck in Ginza on Sunday, standing on top of what he described as a stretching machine that would prevent deep vein thrombosis.
もう一人の反対者は中松義郎(82才)であった。彼はほんの数千票しか過去に得票していないにもかかわらず、東京都知事に5回立候補していた。中松氏(何百もの機械装置に対して功績を主張する発明者)は、深部静脈血栓症を防止するストレッチマシンだと彼が説明したものの上に立って、彼のトラックの前で、銀座で日曜日に運動した。

As a loudspeaker played a recorded speech, he described campaigning by walking or riding a bicycle as something from “another era.”
拡声器が録音された演説を流しているときに、彼は、歩くかまたは自転車に乗って運動することは「別の時代」から来た代物だと評した。

There were other opponents of self-restraint. While the ethos has been strongest in northern Japan and in the Tokyo area, western Japan appeared split. Kobe, the site of a 1995 earthquake, was firmly in favor.
他にも自粛の反対者がいた。その精神[自粛]は北日本と東京地域で非常に強かったが、西日本では分裂が見られた。神戸(1995年の地震の現場)はしっかりと賛成した。

But Toru Hashimoto, the governor of Osaka, Japan’s second-biggest city, said too much holding back would hurt the economy. Echoing President Bush after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Mr. Hashimoto urged people to spend even more, so as to support the economy; some businesses are helping by donating part of their proceeds to affected areas.
しかし橋本徹(日本で二番目に大きい都市である大阪府の知事)は、自粛は経済を害すると言い過ぎた。2001年9月11日の攻撃の後のブッシュ大統領を模倣して、橋本氏は経済を支えるよう、人々に、より一層消費するよう勧めた。一部の企業は、彼らの収益の一部を寄付することにより被災地域を援助している。

In Tokyo, though, there was no debate.
しかし東京ではそういう議論がない。

At Hair ZA/ZA, a salon in the Shin Koenji neighborhood, appointments have dried up because so many school and corporate ceremonies have been canceled. The rolling blackouts could also make it hard for customers to keep reservations, according to Takayuki Yamamoto, the salon’s chief hair stylist.
Hair ZAZA(新高円寺の近くのサロン)では、非常に多くの学校と会社の式典が中止されたため、予約はすっかりなくなった。輪番停電は、山本タカユキ(そのサロンのヘアースタイリストのチーフ)によると、顧客が予約を守ることもまた難しくなった。

This has upended Ayaka Kanzaki’s plans to pass the salon’s tests for new stylists. The exam includes three components: cutting, blow-drying and hair coloring. Ms. Kanzaki, 21, passed the cutting section, but to qualify for the hair coloring test, she must recruit 20 models. So far, she has managed just seven and is worried about getting 13 more.
このことは、新たなスタイリストのための、そのサロンのテストにパスするという神埼綾香の計画をひっくり返した。その試験は3つの構成要素から成る。カット、ブローそしてヘアカラー。神埼さん(21才)はカット部門にパスしたが、ヘアカラーのテストの資格を得るには、20人のモデルを募集しなければならない。これまで、彼女はちょうど7人の都合を付けたが、さらに13人を手に入れることができるかどうか心配している。

The salon’s efforts to reduce electricity use have made it difficult to practice after hours, too. In addition to turning off the lights, training with blow dryers has been stopped. Ms. Kanzaki, however, keeps any frustration to herself.
電気使用を減らすというそのサロンの努力は、営業時間後に練習することもまた困難にした。照明を消すことに加えて、ヘアドライヤーによる訓練も止められた。神埼さんは、それでも、どんなフラストレーションも表に出さない。

“I’m not the only one in this condition,” she said, in a remark that typified Japanese selflessness. “Others are, too.”
「このような状態にあるのは私一人ではありません。」と彼女は、日本の無私無欲を代表するような言葉で言った。「他の人もそうです。」